August 19, 2017

Book Review | This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral — plus plenty of valet parking! — in America’s Gilded Capital by Mark Leibovich

If you needed any reason to be cynical about American politics–especially nationally–then Mark Leibovich’s This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral — plus plenty of valet parking! — in America’s Gilded Capital is the book for you. I guarantee that you will not put it down with a single breath of hope and optimism  about […]

Book Review | The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: Visions of Glory, 1874-1932 by William Manchester

There are few political leaders that have captured my imagination like Winston Churchill does. William Manchester not only tells the story of what is perhaps Britain’s greatest prime minister, he does it in fantastic detail. I’ve read complaints that Manchester uses perhaps too much detail, but I could not have enjoyed it more. Manchester paints […]

Book Review | Glittering Images: A Journey Through Art from Egypt to Star Wars by Camille Paglia

Over the years, I’ve run into Camille Paglia’s essays at unexpected times, and I seem to always come away thoughtful and, occasionally, amused. Clearly coming from a perspective distant from my own, politically and culturally a member of East Coast academia, I never the less found her insights and way of putting things provocative. When […]

Book Review | Aftershock: Protect Yourself and Profit in the Next Global Financial Meltdown by Wiedemer, Wiedemer, and Spitzer

I can’t recall who exactly recommended this to me when I first picked this up back in 2010 or 2011, but I do recall the cautionary note that they took as they described it and the author’s conclusions. The global recession had begun four years earlier, since which time I had just barely been able […]

Book Review | Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956 by Anne Applebaum

Perhaps what is most fascinating about the strange episode of human history under which the communist oppression of Eastern Europe falls is that it has gone so long without a comprehensive history of how it occurred. Anne Applebaum‘s Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956 appears to step into that gap, providing in-depth research and a […]

Book Review | An Edible History of Humanity by Tom Standage [Contributor]

Food is the nouveau topic to write about. Whether it’s an exposition on the mad genius that is Ferran Adrià, or the theological import of maize in the Mayan culture, food is where it’s at. In this vein,  An Edible History of Humanity by Tom Standage examines food and its impact on the whole of human development. […]

Book Review | Guest of Honor: Booker T. Washington, Theodore Roosevelt, and the White House Dinner That Shocked a Nation by Deborah Davis [Contributor]

Some happenings are simultaneously obscure, interesting, and pregnant with historical import. When all of these elements come together, an exploration of the happening and how it shaped subsequent history cannot be anything but a great read. Such is the premise of Guest of Honor: Booker T. Washington, Theodore Roosevelt, and the White House Dinner That […]